Libya

Quantitative Easing: Rate Recap & Timeline

For the past 2.5 years, the Fed has run two rounds of rate stimulus known as quantitative easing (QE), which is bond buying to drive prices up and rates down. QE2 ends June 30, so here’s a chart recapping 30yr fixed rates from crisis peak to now. It’s labeled to show how QE1, QE2, and

WeeklyBasis 3/26/11: Rates Likely Up 2nd Week

Rates ended last week up .125% after being even for three weeks. Poor new and existing home sales, rattled consumers, and the Portugal flare-up in Europe’s debt crisis last week would normally cause rates to drop as mortgage bonds rally. But bonds lost ground as investors moved to stocks, pushing the S&P 500 up 2.7%

Not-A-War In Libya: Summary Of Key Issues

Even with today’s rebel victory, political chatter is red hot since the UN authorized a coalition of nations last week to bomb Libya in order to protect citizens there from their own leader. Should Western nations even be involved? Can you enforce the UN resolution without occupying the country long-term? Which coalition country should be

WeeklyBasis 3/20/11: Rates In No-Fly Zone

Despite big intraday fluctuations of +/-.25%, rates ended last week even for the third straight week. WeeklyBasis predicted rates would be up slightly on higher U.S. business inflation, perception that Europe’s debt crisis seems more contained, and less North Africa/Middle East turmoil than expected—all but the last point happened, which is why investors were net

WeeklyBasis 3/20/11: Rates In No-Fly Zone

Despite big intraday fluctuations of +/-.25%, rates ended last week even for the third straight week. WeeklyBasis predicted rates would be up slightly on higher U.S. business inflation, perception that Europe’s debt crisis seems more contained, and less North Africa/Middle East turmoil than expected—all but the last point happened, which is why investors were net

Libya Returns To Center Stage With Japan: Summary & Market Reaction

Liyba’s civil war has been buried by Japan’s post-tsunami nuclear disaster and a huge week for U.S. economic news. But as U.S. news dies down today, the UN announced a no-fly zone and authorized use of air attacks against Libya to protect pro-democracy citizens who’ve been bombed by Muammar Gaddafi’s government for the past month

Libya Returns To Center Stage With Japan: Summary & Market Reaction

Liyba’s civil war has been buried by Japan’s post-tsunami nuclear disaster and a huge week for U.S. economic news. But as U.S. news dies down today, the UN announced a no-fly zone and authorized use of air attacks against Libya to protect pro-democracy citizens who’ve been bombed by Muammar Gaddafi’s government for the past month

WeeklyBasis 3/12/11: Global Chaos vs U.S. Inflation & Fed Data

As predicted, rates ended last week even after big volatility caused +/-.3% intraday rate swings. Following the devastating Japanese earthquake and tsunami, mortgage bonds surprisingly weren’t Friday’s safety buy and instead sold (rates up) for four main reasons: (1) profit taking after bonds rallied huge Thursday (rates down) on a very successful 30yr Treasury auction,

WeeklyBasis 3/5/11: Oil Wars & Retail Stores

Rates ended last week even, with 30yr fixed loans settling at 4.875% after a wild ride. Bond traders face tough choices right now: sell (rates rise) because rising oil and commodities are causing inflation? Or buy (rates drop) because bonds are a safe haven from turmoil in Libya? The tough choices are compounded when Libyan