Consumer Sentiment

Consumer Sentiment Up. Inventories up. Will Consumers Really Spend?

Import/Export Prices (October 2012) Export Prices – Month/Month + 0.0% Export Prices – Year/Year +1.4% Import Prices – Month/Month +0.5% Import Prices – Year/Year +0.4% Trade prices and volume could prove interesting in the coming 12 months.  Important factors are:  decreased demand for exports as parts of the EU fall into recession. Flat or decreased

Core Inflation Contained, Consumer Sentiment Strong.

PPI (September 2012) – PPI (wholesale inflation) Month/Month core (less food and energy) was +.0.0% – PPI (wholesale inflation) Month/Month overall +1.1% – PPI (wholesale inflation) Year/Year core (less food and energy) was +2.3% The contained core is what is important as a longer term macroeconomic indicator.  With the Fed’s enormous expansion of money supply

Real Personal Income, Chicago PMI and Consumer Sentiment All Lower

Personal Income and Outlays (August 2012) Personal Income – Month/Month +0.1% Consumer Spending – Month/Month +0.5% PCE Price Index — Month/Month +0.4% Core PCE price index – Month/Month 0.1% Nominal Income was up slightly.  Real (inflation adjusted) income was down. Higher gas prices made real income lower.  Factoring out food and gas real income was

Real Personal Income, Chicago PMI and Consumer Sentiment All Lower

Personal Income and Outlays (August 2012) Personal Income – Month/Month +0.1% Consumer Spending – Month/Month +0.5% PCE Price Index — Month/Month +0.4% Core PCE price index – Month/Month 0.1% Nominal Income was up slightly.  Real (inflation adjusted) income was down. Higher gas prices made real income lower.  Factoring out food and gas real income was